Total lunar eclipse and Super Blood Moon were photo op

Posted 6/1/21

HENDRY COUNTY- The first total lunar eclipse in two years took place on May 26, 2021 and was a Super Blood Moon.

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Total lunar eclipse and Super Blood Moon were photo op

Posted

HENDRY COUNTY- The first total lunar eclipse in two years took place on May 26, 2021 and was a Super Blood Moon. It was visible from some parts of the Pacific, the Atlantic, and the Indian ocean. Hendry County residents, from Montura and Pioneer to LaBelle and Fort Denaud, attempted to capture the event with their cameras.

A total lunar eclipse happens when the Earth comes between the sun and the moon, blocking the sun’s rays from directly reaching the satellite. The moon is fully in the Earth’s shadow.

“A super moon happens when moon is at or near its closest point to Earth at the same time as it is full. Because the full moon is a little bit closer to us than usual, it appears especially large and bright in the sky,” said astronomy enthusiast and long-time LaBelle resident, Angie Dwyer. “Supermoons only happen three to four times a year, and always appear consecutively.”

She added, “It is sometimes difficult to tell if it’s a super moon visually, but it does have an effect on Earth. It can cause higher tides than usual.”

The moon appeared slightly reddish-orange in color, and huge as many locals used their cellphones and cameras to try to document it. Social media was flooded with various images of the eclipse.

According to NASA “not all Supermoons are red in appearance, and an eclipse does not usually take place at the same time. But this one is different.”

“Full moons rise in the east around sunset and set in the west around sunrise. A lunar eclipse can be hard to catch. The total eclipse, or the time when the moon is in deepest shadow, lasts for about 15 minutes. If the moon is up in your area when it happens, you are in for a treat,” said Dwyer.

If you missed the supermoon eclipse, you can still explore this phenomenon second by second with NASA’s Scientific Visualization Studio: https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/4902

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