Animal control rescues baby bird

Posted 6/8/21

CLEWISTON- On Monday morning, June 7, 2021, Clewiston Animal Control (CAC) received a call regarding a baby bird that had fallen from it’s nest at Westside Elementary School.

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Animal control rescues baby bird

Posted

CLEWISTON- On Monday morning, June 7, 2021, Clewiston Animal Control (CAC) received a call regarding a baby bird that had fallen from it’s nest at Westside Elementary School.

CAC responded, and found the young bird was not quite ready to leave its best, and began to search. the quickly spotted the nest, but it was out of reach.

The CAC officers decided to call for help, and “With a quick phone call Public Works employees arrived ladder in hand, and little baby was happily placed back home with an eager momma awaiting nearby.”

By the end of May and into June most Florida bird species are nesting, and many of them have young that are fledging (getting ready to leave their nests). Finding baby birds is very common around this time of year.

What should you do if you find a bird on the ground? First just stand back and observe it. Watch its energy level and behavior to determine if it needs assistance. Before touching the bird or stressing it in any way, watch to see if it can care for itself or if the parent birds are tending to it. If it is not fully feathered and cannot flutter or fly short distances, and it is safe to do so, attempt to return the bird to the nest.

Energetic, active birds that’s are fully feathered should be fine on their own, while weaker, less active, of very young birds may need help. Birds of any age that have clear signs of injuries such as wounds or bent wings will need help.

The mother of the baby bird found at Westside Elementary has since been spotted, by school staff and students, feeding and caring for the baby, and all seems to be well.

For more information on what to do if you find a bird you suspect needs help, contact the Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife (CROW): (239) 472-3644

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